What Your Enneagram Type Says About Your Leadership Style

What Your Enneagram Type Says About Your Leadership Style

Leadership coach Catherine Hayes at Forbes talks about how each Enneagram type can use their unique traits to become a better leader and team member.

The Enneagram personality test is a transformative tool. While many assessments help people understand their strengths, the Enneagram takes it a step further. It’s a map of the human psyche, providing a deep understanding of human behavior.

The Enneagram is a system of nine personality types, showing the interactions among each type. Although we all have the nine types within us, one is most dominant, and with it comes its own set of unique gifts and challenges.

By understanding your type, you can get let go of habitual patterns and open up to your own inherent gifts. As you become more aware of your type, you can move up the levels of growth and ultimately lead from your best self. You understand your reactions, preferences, and how you show up for your team.

With this level of self-awareness, we can be free of the patterns that hold us back and develop an understanding of those with whom we interact.

Type 1: The Reformer

Type 1 leaders get the job done, allowing little to no room for error. Trusting that others can carry out tasks to meet their standards is challenging, which results in difficulty delegating. As you become more aware of this pattern, mentor others. Trust their abilities, and value their input, relieving yourself of the burden of doing it all yourself.

Type 2: The Helper

Type 2 leaders can get caught in their need to be seen as helpful. Their “people-pleasing” behaviors such as flattery and being overly generous can often get in the way of them taking a firm stand when it’s needed. To be an effective and truly selfless leader, let go of the need to take care of everyone else, and make your own needs an equal priority.

Type 3: The Achiever

When Type 3 leaders aren’t aware of their personality type, they live and lead in reaction to an unconscious belief that they are worthless. Thus, they are always trying to prove themselves. They strive for validation by overachieving, often becoming outstanding in their fields, yet frequently at the expense of their personal relationships and emotions.

Get in touch with yourself, and accept that your value comes from who you are and not what you do. You can be an authentic and inspiring leader without needing to be the “shining star.” Relax into a more motivational role, so you can benefit the team and the organization.

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